Search found 3009 matches

by Katharine
Sun Jan 22, 2006 8:37 am
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Hot breakfasts
Replies: 71
Views: 9113

Not only did we have cheese on Sunday we also had CAKE which had to be cut into sufficient pieces. I almost wrote we had cake on Sunday, but wasn't certain I was remembering rightly. Did you still have Home Jam? We could bring in one jar of jam (officially when I went it had to be home made) which ...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 10:33 pm
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Hot breakfasts
Replies: 71
Views: 9113

In my day Sunday tea was always the same - a lump of cheese with bread and marge etc. In 6s the Mons had the job of dividing the cheese into 36 portions! I never had to do that as I wasn't a House Mon but a Headmistress' one, can't remember much of the duties we did for that except various things s...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:33 pm
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Hot breakfasts
Replies: 71
Views: 9113

In my day Sunday tea was always the same - a lump of cheese with bread and marge etc. In 6s the Mons had the job of dividing the cheese into 36 portions! I never had to do that as I wasn't a House Mon but a Headmistress' one, can't remember much of the duties we did for that except various things sh...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 7:28 pm
Forum: General Chat - Non CH
Topic: Word of the day
Replies: 681
Views: 42997

OK, here's a question for you - why 'Cob'? The one you mention seems to be some sort of sea defence, and of course there is the famous 'Cob' at Lyme Regis, which forms the main harbour wall. Any ideas? Can't say why it is called that. My husband may know but he's out at a Ffestiniog Railway Society...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 5:34 pm
Forum: General Chat - Non CH
Topic: Word of the day
Replies: 681
Views: 42997

englishangel wrote:
Katharine wrote: How about set?
Erm....... yes


32 meanings for set, plus all the meanings where it is the prefix.
That's why I didn't list them!! I think I got it from a pub quiz or similar that it was the single word in the English language with the most meanings.
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 5:23 pm
Forum: General Chat - Non CH
Topic: Word of the day
Replies: 681
Views: 42997

englishangel wrote:Cob;
1) Roundish lump.
2) domed loaf
3) corn-cob
4) large hazelnut
5) sturdy riding horse with short legs
6) male swan

OED

surely the word with the most meanings.

Unless of course you know different?
How about set?
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 4:00 pm
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Half to Remember
Replies: 46
Views: 5688

Half to Remember

I have just found my copy of 'Half to Remember'. ; having read through some of the posts here, I was reminded of its existence. I don't know whether I have ever read it through before, but I think I will now. Glancing though, I see that DR does use Christian names for some girls, but there is no dis...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 3:29 pm
Forum: General Chat - Non CH
Topic: Word of the day
Replies: 681
Views: 42997

OK, here's a question for you - why 'Cob'? The one you mention seems to be some sort of sea defence, and of course there is the famous 'Cob' at Lyme Regis, which forms the main harbour wall. Any ideas? Can't say why it is called that. My husband may know but he's out at a Ffestiniog Railway Society...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 12:58 pm
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Hot breakfasts
Replies: 71
Views: 9113

Did you not eat togehter in one dining hall then? When I was there we had most meals in Dining Hall. Tea each day and Sunday breakfast were in houses, also some special occasions when 'they' wanted us out of the way, eg Speech Day. When I was first there we marched from House to Dining Hall each ti...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:34 am
Forum: General Chat - Non CH
Topic: Word of the day
Replies: 681
Views: 42997

trebuchet • noun a machine used in medieval siege warfare for hurling large stones or other missiles. — origin Middle English: from Old French, from trebucher ‘overthrow’. We sometimes have their modern day counterparts repairing the Cob at Porthmadog. I sometimes wonder whether their drive...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:31 am
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: End of Term, sticking and licking, sliding downstairs
Replies: 13
Views: 2463

Richard Ruck wrote:Kennedy's Latin Primer - that must be the one textbook which stayed with me throughout my entire school carreer.
Just goes to prove my point about its shelflife, you were at the RR&A Foundation more than 10 years after me! We certainly had some pre-war ones (I think second war but ...)
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:28 am
Forum: General Chat - CH Stuff
Topic: The New Subscription Blue
Replies: 24
Views: 2649

Anyone who is an Old Blue and is on the Association's database will get the magazine. If you don't know, the easiest way is probably to phone Wendy Killner to see if you are in the database. If you get Housey then you should be registered, but I know they are still struggling with the various OB da...
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:27 am
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: CH food
Replies: 160
Views: 21085

Re: why so many nurses?

I remember the careers advice I got at CH, that girls were best suited to becoming Nurses, Secretaries or Teachers. That was it! If you got that you got far more than I ever did!!! I was pretty good at Maths & Physics. In Upper IV I got 94% in Physics when the whole of the rest of the class failed....
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:11 am
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: Tea & coffee
Replies: 36
Views: 5081

WildOne wrote:I still eat cornflakes from a deep bowl so I can drink the remaining milk CH style with my index finger hooked neatly over the rim. It still feels natural and easy.
Quite agree, it is only when other people look at you that you realise it is not normal behaviour - but then how much of mine is?
by Katharine
Sat Jan 21, 2006 9:09 am
Forum: Hertford Memories
Topic: End of Term, sticking and licking, sliding downstairs
Replies: 13
Views: 2463

Some of our textbooks eg Kennedy's Latin Primer were venerable, and they lasted many years. We used to enjoy seeing who had the earliest name in the front. Sticking & Licking must have saved the school many pounds over the years - but then do all textbooks have such a long shelflife as Kennedy?