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Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:31 am
by jhopgood
I never actually saw a Toyce as they were not implemented in Barnes B when I left in 1966. However, I do remember them being talked about and even having seen a Barnes Wallis design. My recollection is that he wanted a desk that could be swung out of use and sort of folded away, so that everyone could have a desk space but also room to use the dayroom for other matters.
So, in my opinion, it was a Barnes Wallis invention, and probably the word as well.
Not having been into a house since I left, I feel a bit of an intruder, I have no idea what a Toyce finally came to be.
In my day we had 4 long tables in the day room, one across the bottom as you went in, which was for the most recent arrivals, one perpendicular up the middle, which was used for table tennis on Saturday evenings, and two across the top. The top table had bookshelves in the middle, but none of the others did. Around the walls were lockers and strategically placed monitors desks.
So Toyces would have been a good replacement for all of that, but no good for table tennis.

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 10:52 am
by Mid A 15
jhopgood wrote:I never actually saw a Toyce as they were not implemented in Barnes B when I left in 1966. However, I do remember them being talked about and even having seen a Barnes Wallis design. My recollection is that he wanted a desk that could be swung out of use and sort of folded away, so that everyone could have a desk space but also room to use the dayroom for other matters.
So, in my opinion, it was a Barnes Wallis invention, and probably the word as well.
Not having been into a house since I left, I feel a bit of an intruder, I have no idea what a Toyce finally came to be.
In my day we had 4 long tables in the day room, one across the bottom as you went in, which was for the most recent arrivals, one perpendicular up the middle, which was used for table tennis on Saturday evenings, and two across the top. The top table had bookshelves in the middle, but none of the others did. Around the walls were lockers and strategically placed monitors desks.
So Toyces would have been a good replacement for all of that, but no good for table tennis.
Now you mention it I remember the name of Barnes Wallis being mentioned in conjunction with the design of Toyces. I hesitated to post on the subject though in case my memory was playing tricks!

I suppose that fact still does not answer the original question as to the derivation of the word "Toyce" though.

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:26 am
by Ash
Toyce is not in the English dictionary, so must be slang....

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:08 pm
by Great Plum
Maybe it stands for something - but I can't think what...

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:45 pm
by Scone Lover
I would love to know where most of the CH expressions I heard came from because I have never heard them elsewhere.

Bockers, Toyces, Taff. To name but three

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:46 pm
by Richard Ruck
Taff???

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:49 pm
by Ruthie-Baby
in Col B we were told that the toyces were designed by Barnes Wallis, just like the bouncing bomb.

One of the facts we had to learn for our 'Squits test'.

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 1:52 pm
by Scone Lover
Taff = Potatoes more usually as mash but any form would get called Taff

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 2:10 pm
by huntertitus
Great Plum wrote:Maybe it stands for something - but I can't think what...
Table of youthful classroom excellence?

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 6:15 pm
by Great Plum
huntertitus wrote:
Great Plum wrote:Maybe it stands for something - but I can't think what...
Table of youthful classroom excellence?
That does sound posible... it's a shame B.W. is no longer with us to ask him...

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 6:31 pm
by huntertitus
Great Plum wrote:
huntertitus wrote:
Great Plum wrote:Maybe it stands for something - but I can't think what...
Table of youthful classroom excellence?
That does sound posible... it's a shame B.W. is no longer with us to ask him...
Do you know I met him at CH in the 70's and actually got his autograph

It was one of the most prized in my collection and now I can't find it anywhere

i still have my cricket autographs though including John Snow a famous OB cricketer playing for Sussex and England if I remember right

Posted: Mon Oct 16, 2006 6:47 pm
by Katharine
huntertitus wrote:i still have my cricket autographs though including John Snow a famous OB cricketer playing for Sussex and England if I remember right
Thorn B, about the same time as my brother, I believe.

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 12:29 am
by Scone Lover
huntertitus wrote:
Great Plum wrote:Maybe it stands for something - but I can't think what...
Table of youthful classroom excellence?
Oh boy, if we are going to get literal, what the hell will bocker come out as?

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 7:57 am
by DavebytheSea
Ruthie-Baby wrote:in Col B we were told that the toyces were designed by Barnes Wallis, just like the bouncing bomb.

One of the facts we had to learn for our 'Squits test'.
.... must have made them damn uncomfortable to work in.

Posted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 7:58 am
by englishangel
huntertitus wrote:
Great Plum wrote:
huntertitus wrote: Table of youthful classroom excellence?
That does sound posible... it's a shame B.W. is no longer with us to ask him...
Do you know I met him at CH in the 70's and actually got his autograph

It was one of the most prized in my collection and now I can't find it anywhere

I still have my cricket autographs though including John Snow a famous OB cricketer playing for Sussex and England if I remember right
You do. You would have been about 14 when he virtually won a Test Match (probably against the Aussies) single handed. It was on Horsham Speech Day and after lunch we toasted the Queen, Housie, and John Snow.