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Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Thu Sep 16, 2010 4:45 pm
by wurzel
NEILL THE NOTORIOUS wrote: On another Topic, I wondered what had happened to the three Silver Bugles played at Tea Parade ---

Wurzle's Post may be the Solution !!!!
It is definitely a silver CORNET (i had to clean all the tarnish off when i got it) and it has engraving all down the bell with a variety of dates of expos including in the largest type face the Paris Expo.

I think that should answer whether it was a tea parade instrument as anyone who had played it would not forget the inscription

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Fri Sep 17, 2010 11:43 am
by NEILL THE NOTORIOUS
YEP ! a lot of difference with a CORNET --- Valves !

I still have my silver Cornet -- a Class A Besson -- pre War -- bought for me by my Parents for £25 -- a lot of money in 1944 !

Now worth a lot more --- insured for £1000 !!! :oops:

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Wed Sep 22, 2010 10:40 pm
by Great Plum
michael scuffil wrote:I went to the top of Sharpenhurst at some time in the 90s and found that the construction at the summit was fenced off. Which was a great pity, because you no longer have a magnificent panoramic view taking in Leith Hill to the north as well as Lancing College chapel and (what's left of) Chanctonbury Ring to the south.
That was easily solved - for a number of years the fencing to the south west had been 'broken' and you were able to scramble up there (as many a scout did!) However, in the last couple of years, they have put a far more sturdy fence around - I believe Josh was going to try to dig under but I don't know if he was successful...

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 5:03 pm
by cosicarr
how ch slang has changed... we still have some of the old slang such as squits for the 2nd form, tuck shop, civvies, but thats about it apart from the slang that all kids use...

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 2:42 pm
by NEILL THE NOTORIOUS
I suppose it would have to be myself, who has remembered "Down the Bogs"
A punishment for the unpopular, certainly in the 40s --- but probably not in the refined atmosphere, which accompanied the arrival of the Ladies :oops:

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Mon Sep 27, 2010 4:22 pm
by kerrensimmonds
That language was commonplace in Hertford, at least in my time...........

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Fri Oct 01, 2010 9:44 am
by NEILL THE NOTORIOUS
The language may have been the same ----- but I cannot believe that the punishment was !! :oops:

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 2:08 pm
by Jabod2
wurzel wrote:
Thu May 27, 2010 12:45 pm
Crab, flab and Muck was the slang name for the dining room trade of getting/clearing the bread jam/marmalade and butter for the tables thoughout the 80's and Kiff was still standard use for dining hall tea.
I recall it as CRAM, flab and muck for the individual items in the 60s/70s.

I also still have one of the last surviving plain kiff bowls which I 'liberated' before I left - they were reused for 'muck'

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Sun Mar 04, 2018 10:05 pm
by dsmg
In the 70s it was definitely crug (or krug as some have written).

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Mon Mar 05, 2018 1:21 pm
by Spoonbill
As I understand it: In the '60s and '70s, Maine, Barnes and Leigh Hunt all used the terms flab and muck, but whereas Maine and Leigh Hunt called bread crug, in Barnes it was more generally referred to as slice, I believe (or was that just in Barnes B?). Where that frankly pathetic excuse for a word originated, I have no idea, but crug was the word with pedigree, hence Old Blues having been referred to as crug brothers in the past. Slice brothers just doesn't have the same historic ring to it, does it?

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Thu Mar 08, 2018 10:44 pm
by keibat
I was in Barnes *B* from the mid 50s to the early 60s, having started in the Prep.
Flab for butter, yes; and crug for bread. Muck rings no nostalgic bells (whereas in the 2010 sections of this thread, re-encountering spadge hit me quite powerfully!) - nor does slice.
So BaB must have 'gone slice' after my time.

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:56 pm
by rockfreak
Yes, I'm of your vintage Keith. Crug and Flab. Although when I went up into the senior school I got haughtily told off for calling it Crug. It was apparently Bread in the Upper. How typical of the English boarding school. Thus do those above us seek to put us down with sneering pedantic corrections. We built a class system and an empire with this tactic. I believe that to some extent it persists to this day.

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 9:24 am
by Spoonbill
Yes, all three words were definitely 'Junior'. Kif and skiffage were the only food-related words which were in use by Seniors as well as Juniors, as far as I remember.

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 10:35 am
by jhopgood
As a Ba B contemporary of Keibat, I can only remember Flab and Kiff. His memory is obviously better than mine, so maybe he remembers where my nickname came from, which I inherited from Michael Hilliard, I think. My brother inherited from me.

Re: HOUSEY SLANG

Posted: Sat Mar 10, 2018 11:14 am
by Avon
rockfreak wrote:
Fri Mar 09, 2018 8:56 pm
Yes, I'm of your vintage Keith. Crug and Flab. Although when I went up into the senior school I got haughtily told off for calling it Crug. It was apparently Bread in the Upper. How typical of the English boarding school. Thus do those above us seek to put us down with sneering pedantic corrections. We built a class system and an empire with this tactic. I believe that to some extent it persists to this day.
An alternative interpretation might be that in the upper house such slang was seen as childish and a far more useful word for bread might actually be ‘bread?’

But don’t let that get in the way of the massive chip you bear and your one man crusade to subvert every thread across to class war.