Housie firsts

Anything that doesn't fit anywhere else, but that's still CH related.

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Re: Housie firsts

Post by sejintenej » Sun Oct 25, 2015 1:49 pm

michael scuffil wrote:Re telegrams

1) my parents got one from JH Page on the last day of term (i.e. the day we should have gone home) reading 'Son indisposed. Letter follows.' (This was in about 1960/61, at the start of the summer holidays. About 200 boys went down with vomiting and diarrhoea. We went home on the Friday rather than the Tuesday, I think.)
I think that this would have had to have been 1961 (of the two) because I don't remember any problem in 1960 and I left school about five days early in 1961 (to go to a job abroad) and didn't hear of any problem.

OTOH on another occasion after it swept the school Kit didn't warn my mother that I was coming home with the mumps: did not go down well with those I came into contact with - train passengers, overnight ferry passengers etc.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by J.R. » Sun Oct 25, 2015 4:34 pm

I don't thnk I was inflenced by any masters political views, or lack thereof.

The illness episode at the end of term definitely affected me as I remember having a couple of days in the sicker after the end of term before being allowed home, though the year alludes me. I only remember that they were a fantastic couple of days because rules and regs seemed to be totally abandoned. Even Dr. Tommy Scott became human. How long was he school doctor for ? I was born in 1947 and someone said he was at CH then, so he must have been a long serving school doctor.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by Mid A 15 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 8:31 pm

J.R. wrote:I don't thnk I was inflenced by any masters political views, or lack thereof.

The illness episode at the end of term definitely affected me as I remember having a couple of days in the sicker after the end of term before being allowed home, though the year alludes me. I only remember that they were a fantastic couple of days because rules and regs seemed to be totally abandoned. Even Dr. Tommy Scott became human. How long was he school doctor for ? I was born in 1947 and someone said he was at CH then, so he must have been a long serving school doctor.
Tommy Scott was School Doctor when I started in 1965 and retired while I was there. I would guess c 1968. He was succeeded by Dr Hoskins (or was it Hopkins) c 1968. Hoskins (Hopkins) was (is) an Old Blue I believe.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by Mid A 15 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 8:32 pm

Mid A 15 wrote:
J.R. wrote:I don't thnk I was inflenced by any masters political views, or lack thereof.

The illness episode at the end of term definitely affected me as I remember having a couple of days in the sicker after the end of term before being allowed home, though the year alludes me. I only remember that they were a fantastic couple of days because rules and regs seemed to be totally abandoned. Even Dr. Tommy Scott became human. How long was he school doctor for ? I was born in 1947 and someone said he was at CH then, so he must have been a long serving school doctor.
Tommy Scott was School Doctor when I started in 1965 and retired while I was there. I would guess c 1968. He was succeeded by Dr Hoskins (or was it Hopkins) c 1968. Hoskins (Hopkins), like Tommy Scott, was (is) an Old Blue I believe.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by Mid A 15 » Sun Oct 25, 2015 8:46 pm

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Re: Housie firsts

Post by Kit Bartlett » Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:10 am

Tommy Hoskins was in Peele B 1917-24, He succeeded Dr. G.E. Friend in 1946 as School Doctor as it was called then.
One of his earliest tasks in his new post was to eat all school meals in Dining Hall as served to the boys. This was to test the adequacy of the diet. He sat at the Coleridge B dining table and did not have any extra meals elsewhere.

Trevor Hoskins was in Coleridge B from 1940-50, entering the school when only nine years old. He had a fine singing voice and sang in The Old Blues Operatic Society.

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Re: Housie firsts

Post by sejintenej » Mon Oct 26, 2015 10:51 am

J.R. wrote: Even Dr. Tommy Scott became human. How long was he school doctor for ? I was born in 1947 and someone said he was at CH then, so he must have been a long serving school doctor.
In my dealings with him both as patient and as pupil he was almost always friendly. OK he did get upset sometimes with malingerers.

My memories are more of when he was teaching first aid to two CCF platoons. That went well beyond putting burns in cold water - we had to be able to deal with fractures, spinal injuries and even childbirth (unfortunately we couldn't practice or even witness that!) on the basis that no qualified doctor would be available for four weeks . Dr Scott did make the comment that if he were ever in an accident he hoped that it woud be one of us and not a doctor who had to patch him up at the roadside.

Someone mentioned Dr Friend; I hope it wasn't the one I had a run-in with. Last minute business trip abroad and I had to get the jabs - all of them. Dr Friend had 12 syringes and one phial (polio) lined up when I arrived and simply started at the beginning and emptied every one of them in turn. He even included smallpox! The word pincushion applied. Of course some of them needed time to work - time I didn't have - and he ignored the fact that I already had jabs for several from previous employment.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by J.R. » Mon Oct 26, 2015 12:51 pm

sejintenej wrote:
J.R. wrote: Even Dr. Tommy Scott became human. How long was he school doctor for ? I was born in 1947 and someone said he was at CH then, so he must have been a long serving school doctor.
In my dealings with him both as patient and as pupil he was almost always friendly. OK he did get upset sometimes with malingerers.

My memories are more of when he was teaching first aid to two CCF platoons. That went well beyond putting burns in cold water - we had to be able to deal with fractures, spinal injuries and even childbirth (unfortunately we couldn't practice or even witness that!) on the basis that no qualified doctor would be available for four weeks . Dr Scott did make the comment that if he were ever in an accident he hoped that it woud be one of us and not a doctor who had to patch him up at the roadside.

Someone mentioned Dr Friend; I hope it wasn't the one I had a run-in with. Last minute business trip abroad and I had to get the jabs - all of them. Dr Friend had 12 syringes and one phial (polio) lined up when I arrived and simply started at the beginning and emptied every one of them in turn. He even included smallpox! The word pincushion applied. Of course some of them needed time to work - time I didn't have - and he ignored the fact that I already had jabs for several from previous employment.



Strange that David, coz I was recently having a social chat with Justin, my current GP about vaccinations and innoculations for foreign countries and he said that they are instructed that certain vaccinations nowadays must NEVER be administered at the same time. It obviously didn't affect you !!

Looks like Tommy Scott had an almost life-long connection with CH.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by michael scuffil » Mon Oct 26, 2015 2:52 pm

Tommy Scott was in PeB and so was his elder son. However his younger son Peter, who was much younger, was sent to ThB -- I can only think that the doctor regarded ThB under Page as better run than PeB under Matthews. No brainer, really.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by sejintenej » Mon Oct 26, 2015 3:16 pm

J.R. wrote:
Strange that David, coz I was recently having a social chat with Justin, my current GP about vaccinations and innoculations for foreign countries and he said that they are instructed that certain vaccinations nowadays must NEVER be administered at the same time. It obviously didn't affect you !!
.
When you go to the tropics one of the mainstay treat-all anti-malarials (even 50 years after I came back) is still Paludrine. It doesn't stop you getting malaria but stops the sweats and dehydration - your joints ache like with flu. You still get repeats but the remedy is overdoses - I won't disclose how much in public. I am supposed to carry it even now - on a training course in the Brecon Beacons, February we were camped on the tops in snow when I had a repeat late at night - with no pills! Not recommended. :D

What they don't tell you is that Paludrine can damage the memory
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by LongGone » Mon Oct 26, 2015 6:54 pm

"What they don't tell you is that Paludrine can damage the memory"

Sure, they do. You just don't remember.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by J.R. » Tue Oct 27, 2015 11:11 am

LongGone wrote:"What they don't tell you is that Paludrine can damage the memory"

Sure, they do. You just don't remember.

Priceless, LG !!
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by John Knight » Fri Oct 30, 2015 11:45 am

Deleted:

Sorry, I don't want to hijack this thread with my pet moan ...
Last edited by John Knight on Fri Oct 30, 2015 4:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by Mid A 15 » Fri Oct 30, 2015 1:05 pm

John Knight wrote:Housie Firsts:
'What date did the school allow the pupils to alter the school uniform by wearing the broadie buckle at the back?'
And why did the staff not prevent it?

I get so wound up by this subject that I will not go back to visit the school ...
It certainly happened in the sixties John.

In addition people would wear the girdle almost round the hips rather than the waist.

Neither were universal but common enough to be noticeable.
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Re: Housie firsts

Post by michael scuffil » Sat Oct 31, 2015 11:03 am

We were told from the outset that it was a girdle not a belt, and was not to be worn around the waist. But conversely, you were giving yourself airs if you wore it more than about 2 inches below the coat waistline, unless you were a grecian or otherwise quite senior, when wearing it too high was nerdish. The elegant would ensure that the girdle was higher on one side than the other. The buckle was in front, but off centre.
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