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Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 6:37 am
by Alex
Every house had an appointed time for the weighing (set about 20 min apart?) which took place at the Infirmary. On arriving (marching at ease) at the narrow path which led to the Infirmary I recollect we then marched in single file, the only occasion we ever did this. One senior boy in each house was assigned to record the weights, etc. He was presumably appropriately trained and usually either a mathematician or scientist. Boys were weighed, and other measurements were taken, in ‘roll order’ (ie the order in which their names appeared in the ‘House List’ - see the thread, ‘Official lists at CH Horsham.’). I think the person who did the actual weighing was Mr Drummond (the Doctor’s admin assistant, until summarily dismissed, allegedly for an affair with Nan, a domestic employed at the Infirmary).

Divided Services meant that morning Sunday Chapel was replaced by two consecutive services. One was for more junior boys, the other for the remainder. I cannot recall the dividing line (LE or UF probably) or the order in which the two services were conducted.

Others doubtlessly know more about both these matters.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:15 am
by Foureyes
Alex,
Many thanks.
David

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 2:13 pm
by J.R.
With regard to weighing, (which I'm sure took place, but don't recall), Dr. (Tommy) Scott was renowned for recording development progress especially with regard to nutrition, so I imagine he was instrumental.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 4:24 pm
by postwarblue
Housey reputedly had an exceptional archive of boys' measurement data of some scientific significance.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 4:26 pm
by postwarblue
Sailing through CH with my eyes wide shut, I never heard of Mr Drummond.


I did however hear of Eithne, via my chum Alf in one of the Barnses, but whether he was taking private biology lessons I cannot presume to say.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 4:35 pm
by J.R.
About 10/15 years ago, CH via a University did a health and statistics survey on consenting OB's.

As the OB's parent statistics were included in the survey, I declined to complete it, being adopted.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 5:30 pm
by sejintenej
J.R. wrote:
Fri Jun 02, 2017 4:35 pm
About 10/15 years ago, CH via a University did a health and statistics survey on consenting OB's.

As the OB's parent statistics were included in the survey, I declined to complete it, being adopted.
That was Bristol University. The conclusion was that on average we would survive longerthan the ordinary male.

Asfor the survey I was also adopted (in effect twice) and took part. In fact I did know s o m e details about my parents' deaths - both by less common causes (no JR, not a matter for the police) but not their health during life.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Fri Jun 02, 2017 9:13 pm
by rockfreak
sejintenej wrote:
Thu Jun 01, 2017 10:08 pm
[rockfreak post_id=138738 time=1496260042 user_id=2156]
Of course there were no females. This was a Protestant school. All stern male disciples and martyrs. Virgins? Annunciations? Pietas? Gettaway!
David, oh David! Where did you go to school? Not CH Horsham by the sound of it! We had all those delicious young ladies(?) from the continent who worked in the kitchen, we had those nurses to cool our fevered brows (or whatever), Peele had the eponymous ladies from the Bridge and, if you played your cards right there was a young " ladies' " boarding school not far beyond Itchingfield.
Of course it did take a certain amount of nerve initially to arrange "scout camps" on bicycle trips for weekends every fortnight in summer, tents, equipment and food supplied! Stone Farm Rocks was the favourite destination

To use your own phrase, Gettaway.
[/quote

I was making my point from a much more generalised way. The women at CH when you and I were there were, as you say, often from a more subservient background. Kitchen staff, domestics, or as in the cases of the nurses in the Sicker, the opposite - somewhat older and therefore unavailable (assuming you had the chat, which I didn't at that age). I well remember the derogatory way that some of my contemporaries used to talk about the kitchen staff, even if, as in some cases, they tried to get off with them. The point is that there were no girls of our own age with whom we could mingle freely on a day to day basis without the recrimination that goes with being at an institution full of Judaeo-Christian hang-ups. I'm sure it's a lot better now.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 2:38 pm
by J.R.
I agree with a lot of the above comments. Going to C.H. at eleven and a half, I suppose the juices were starting to stir, BUT any female seemed 'too old'.

I have stated somewhere on here in the past, there was ONE nurse I adored, probably more as a sibling than a possible romantic adventure. (I am an only child). I think she was probably the ONLY member of C.H. staff, possibly with the exception of the master Chris Read in my final year, who called me John rather than address me by my surname.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Sat Jun 03, 2017 7:02 pm
by Foureyes
It is fascinating that no matter how odd the thread the discussion so often ends up on the subject of the Horsham nurses nd the young ladies who did so many of the chores around the place. I am sure that a psychiatrist could explain it!
David :shock:

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 4:16 pm
by michael scuffil
1) weighing

This was a practice started by Dr Friend, Scott's predecessor. I remember it much as Alex does. But occasionally (beginning of each school year?) the regular weighing and height measurements were supplemented by other measurements: chest, biceps. (In those days, the main point of weighing was to ensure that boys weighed enough*. Obesity was not a problem.)

*Peter Scott, the doctor's son, was in my year at ThB, and never did weigh enough. And every time he weighed in, his father would grumble: 'Wretch!' (Laughs all round.)

2) disruptions

The varsity match (always a Tuesday afternoon in November) meant a half holiday (I think so that masters could go and watch). The CCF field day happened every term, but in the summer was accompanied by a night exercise. There was a special timetable for those not in the CCF (because masters in the CCF weren't available).

We had occasional mass chest X-rays. These must have disrupted the timetable.

The only 'extra' holiday I can remember during my time was for Princess Margaret's wedding.

3) divided chapel

Introduced 1958, I think. I remember going to junior chapel for a year. There were rules about acceptable behaviour for those not attending chapel. Basically 'quiet time' in houses, or 'quiet walks' in the grounds.

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Sun Jun 04, 2017 5:10 pm
by J.R.
Michael mentioned above the 'disruption' of a CCF night exercise.

I remember well getting a couple of hours sleep in an old barn near Amberley before our squad of four had to climb up the side of Bury Hill to the top carrying a bren gun to support forward advancing 'infantry'. We had to rendezvous at the car-park at the top for transport back to CH

The climb was made so much more pleasant by being invited into the 'Squire & Groom' pub at the bottom of the hill by the land-lord for a 'pint on the house'. He was an old soldier and WWII veteran.

Could you imagine the CCF being allowed to carry out such an exercise today under H & S laws AND the current climate of terrorism?

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Mon Jun 05, 2017 7:39 am
by sejintenej
michael scuffil wrote:
Sun Jun 04, 2017 4:16 pm
1) weighing

This was a practice started by Dr Friend, Scott's predecessor. I remember it much as Alex does. But occasionally (beginning of each school year?) the regular weighing and height measurements were supplemented by other measurements: chest, biceps. (In those days, the main point of weighing was to ensure that boys weighed enough*. Obesity was not a problem.)
Dr Friend seems to get around - I had a GP with that name, I recently me another and when the company had to send me abroad at the last moment I had to go and see the company doctor -Dr Friend. I can still see the 13 syringes plus dropper for the polio - he even gave me a smallpox jab. Stupid thing was that I was already immunised for some of them and many of them require two, sometimes three jabs at set intervals; I was flying 18 hours later.

and those underweight were sentenced to daily malt

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 4:59 pm
by Foureyes
Scuffil says: "Introduced 1958, I think. I remember going to junior chapel for a year. There were rules about acceptable behaviour for those not attending chapel. Basically 'quiet time' in houses, or 'quiet walks' in the grounds"

Actually, Michael, they were older than that. I have the 1951-52 termly calendars in front of me, which lists as follows:
"Michaelmas Term. Sunday 4 November 1951.24 after Trinity,. Divided services.
Lent Term. Sunday 17 February 1952. Sexagesima. Divided services.
Summer Term. Sunday 6 July 1952.4th after Trinity. Divided services."

They seems to have happened on just one Sunday in each term, but I can see no particular pattern such as '3rd Sunday in term' or anything like that.

I am intrigued because (A) I have absolutely no recollection of such events and (B) I cannot think of any justification for splitting the boys and, if so, where did the split occur? Just seems odd.

Katherine. Was there a similar split at Hertford?

David

Re: RESEARCH

Posted: Tue Jun 06, 2017 5:12 pm
by J.R.
I'm intriqued by the so called 'chapel split'. I think there were very few Catholic pupils during my time. I can't recall any, but do remember hearing of one or two. Certainly none of the Jewish faith if memory serves.

Given the diversity of the current school and politics there are at present, I wonder, are there any of the Muslim faith as pupils ?