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Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sun Jun 21, 2009 12:08 pm
by lonelymom
J.R. wrote:Sounds familiar !

Maybe we HAVE met !
:shock: :shock:

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sun Aug 15, 2010 8:43 pm
by DavidRawlins
I think that almost anyone who came into contact with Uncle (Kirby) was christened with a nickname by him. I am surprised that this has not been mentioned, maybe he gave up after I left.

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Mon Aug 16, 2010 6:22 pm
by Tommy
Some more staff nicknames for you:

Richard Youdale was known as "Chucker" because, I believe of the way he "chucked" his words at you when he spoke.

Paul Maddren was often referred to as "Spider" because of his long arms and legs when riding his bicycle which made him look like some sort of obscure (four-limbed) arachnid.

John Hargreaves was called Mugger - I never actually found out why!

One of my favourites was Duncan Noel-Paton in the theatre - Funky-Dunky! :lol:

Mike Carrington of course was "Boomer" due to his rather loud voice...

Roger Martin was "Dodger"

Tim Alexander was "Hammer"

There were many others but I struggling to remember some of them...

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Fri Oct 15, 2010 10:47 pm
by gsjones
I had totally forgotten about Boomer Carrington,how I don't know.

My nickname was given to me by J.D Shippam and it 'Grunt',I believe I inherited from the last person in school with my name

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Wed May 04, 2011 5:30 pm
by Bingo the Poop-Eating Dog
DavidRawlins wrote:I think that almost anyone who came into contact with Uncle (Kirby) was christened with a nickname by him. I am surprised that this has not been mentioned, maybe he gave up after I left.
The (I hope) immortal Chips Ryder also used to give nicknames to most of the boys in his class.

I remember that Tom Hare-Duke was thus 'Rare Spook' for 40 minutes at a time and Russell Bravo was 'Brillo Pad'. Whether his nicknames for non-white pupils were of the politically correct variety, I have no recollection. Let's hope so.

Chips Ryder recollections, anyone?

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Thu May 05, 2011 9:19 am
by jhopgood
Bingo the Poop-Eating Dog wrote:
Chips Ryder recollections, anyone?
S'mink or s'more ink?

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Thu May 05, 2011 10:40 am
by NEILL THE NOTORIOUS
I was "Swauch" --- in my early years at CH.

It would be impossible to deduce --- but it referred to my Accent (Stockwell !)

Referring back to Lucy --- who was my nursemaid -- this was his surname, I don't think he had a nickname.

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sat May 07, 2011 2:48 pm
by J.R.
jhopgood wrote:
Bingo the Poop-Eating Dog wrote:
Chips Ryder recollections, anyone?
S'mink or s'more ink?

I can see his face in my minds-eye, but can't recall him teaching me.

What was/were his subject/s ??

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:30 pm
by Jabod2
huntertitus wrote:Just remembered another

BO Shippen

Why BO?

B.O.
Ah - the punishment of turning his sleeping bag inside out to air after a misdemeanour on a Scout camp was very severe...

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:44 pm
by Jabod2
huntertitus wrote:Horsham staff list early 1969 Pot Bevan, B*gger Haydon, Ping Vincent Smith... Some teachers were referred to with their first name and not a rude nickname, like
Pop Bevan, Chunder Hayden, Instant-Smith, Basil Gregory, Tom Keeley.

Milt for Seaman. Spewsome for Newsome.

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sat Nov 19, 2011 8:34 pm
by sejintenej
Jabod2 wrote: Pop Bevan, Chunder Hayden, Instant-Smith, Basil Gregory, Tom Keeley.
Milt for Seaman. Spewsome for Newsome.
No doubt Seaman's fishy name developed from the human equivalent used when I was there.

How KFOR came to be used in the mid 1950's escapes me: does anyone know?

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sun Nov 20, 2011 12:55 pm
by J.R.
Jabod2 wrote:
huntertitus wrote:Just remembered another

BO Shippen

Why BO?

B.O.
Ah - the punishment of turning his sleeping bag inside out to air after a misdemeanour on a Scout camp was very severe...

R.A. Hewitt, Asst Housemaster Coleridge B was sometime referred to as B.... O..... Hewitt, but because of his unfortunate breath problem, not his personal hygiene !

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Mon Nov 21, 2011 8:52 pm
by Tommy
Jane Jenkins (Biology teacher) was known as Auntie Planty due to her love of all things botanic.

As for some pupils' nicknames, here we go...

Wedgie, Ludwig, Uncle, Boggy, Pinhead, Binhead, Flid, Trashley, Bod, Longy, Hover, Spud, Muncher, Tank, Slim, The Blade, Bottom, Flapper, Baggy, Jelly, Boney, Nimh, Gimpy, Foetus, Big Chugga, Bric, Billy, Frankie, Wurzel, Doo-da, Flanger, Larry, Maisie, Pug, Pig, Noel, Dosser, Half, Weasel, Spoony, & Face. These are just a few I remember (not all from my own year) aside from the usual that are derived from both christian and surnames such as mine (Tommy).

Any more?? :lol:

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Thu Nov 24, 2011 8:49 pm
by Vonny
Tommy wrote:J
Wedgie, Ludwig, Uncle, Boggy, Pinhead, Binhead, Flid, Trashley, Bod, Longy, Hover, Spud, Muncher, Tank, Slim, The Blade, Bottom, Flapper, Baggy, Jelly, Boney, Nimh, Gimpy, Foetus, Big Chugga, Bric, Billy, Frankie, Wurzel, Doo-da, Flanger, Larry, Maisie, Pug, Pig, Noel, Dosser, Half, Weasel, Spoony, & Face. These are just a few I remember (not all from my own year) aside from the usual that are derived from both christian and surnames such as mine (Tommy).

Any more?? :lol:
I remember a few from that list. Do you remember Baldrick? Can't for the life of me remember his real name but he was in PeA and in my year.

Re: Your nickname

Posted: Sun Nov 27, 2011 11:55 am
by michael scuffil
Pop Beaven's surname was spelt thus. As he always used to say: 'Beaven is to heaven as bell is to hell."

Seaman's nickname 'Milt' suddenly appeared in 1963. Before that he was universally known (to the boys) as 'Clarence'. 'Milt' certainly was due to Milt Jackson of the MJQ, who were making it big at the time. Seaman's initials CME stood for Clarence Milton Edwards. His friends and family called him 'George' (which is also on the back of his headstone in Itchingfield churchyard). This derived from Richard III Act I Scene I

GLOUCESTER
Brother, good day; what means this armed guard
That waits upon your grace?
CLARENCE
His majesty
Tendering my person's safety, hath appointed
This conduct to convey me to the Tower.
GLOUCESTER
Upon what cause?
CLARENCE
Because my name is George.