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Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Sun Jul 20, 2008 11:27 pm
by nastymum
Jo is right. Miss Morrison was no teacher though she my well have been witty. I remember one memorably dull sequence of lessons which involved the alleged teaching of a Jane Austen Novel. So memorable that I have forgotten which one. She read the entire novel to us which we dutifully followed armed with a pencil and ruler.We were merely required to guess which lines were quotable and underline them . As this constituted almost every word of the novel we were either paralysed with fear at getting it wrong or underlined the entire book. There was no comment made by Miss Morrison or any questions asked by the pupils. She then set an essay title and our responses were subject to her dry wit. Or bullying, depending on your point of view.The pupis in the 'other set' scoffed and derided us for being so stupid as to end up in Miss Morrison's set in the first place .
There was no teaching of anything as far as I can see now. You just had to work it out yourself and sink or swim.

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 11:10 am
by gma
Started post on BJM and then thought, d'ya know, sod her! If she liked you you were OK if she didn't it was over before it started! Got tax returns to agree and will save my bile for that!!

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Mon Jul 21, 2008 1:09 pm
by Great Plum
Vonny wrote:
CHAZ wrote: Maybe Mr Endacott had retired.
No - he was there when I was at Horsham and he & his wife were house master/mistress of one of the girls houses. It wasn't BaB so must've been either BaA, ColA or ColB.

Other teachers I've remembered were Mr Sillett, Miss Lindsay (also my housemistress in BaB), Mr Robinson (who went on to marry Miss Hartnett), Miss Muir (also attatched to BaB), Mr Jeffers (also housemaster of PeA) .......
Mr Endacott was PeA housemaster before Dad (pre 1995) and he taught me GCSE English... I think he finally retired in 1999/2000 time...

Re:

Posted: Mon Jul 28, 2008 4:46 pm
by LongGone
[quote="J.R."]I seem to remember 'Killer' Fry had quite a glowing military record. Could that have had anything to do with it ? I seemed to remember he held quite a high decoration.

Yes: won the MC, I believe in Burma. We always called him "Dick", I don't remember 'Killer" at all. My mother was smitten by him and though he looked like the Australian actor Chips Rafferty.
I regard him as the finest teacher I ever had and he certainly was the person who encouraged me to feel I was actually capable to achieving something worthwhile. I got to know him quite well some 15 years after I left. He was working on his PhD and we would swap stories about our research experience.

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:43 pm
by J.R.
Recalling a conversation I had with 'Killer' on a quiet afternoon, I'm sure he had some connection with 'Special Forces', as well !

Possibly S.A.S. ?

Re: Re:

Posted: Tue Jul 29, 2008 8:46 pm
by loringa
LongGone wrote:
J.R. wrote:I seem to remember 'Killer' Fry had quite a glowing military record. Could that have had anything to do with it ? I seemed to remember he held quite a high decoration.

Yes: won the MC, I believe in Burma.
I can't remember where it is but I've posted a copy of his MC citation somewhere on this forum.

In Defence Of -

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:26 am
by Angela Woodford
nastymum wrote:.Miss Morrison was no teacher though she my well have been witty.... we were either paralysed with fear at getting it wrong or underlined the entire book. There was no comment made by Miss Morrison or any questions asked by the pupils. She then set an essay title and our responses were subject to her dry wit. Or bullying, depending on your point of view.The pupis in the 'other set' scoffed and derided us for being so stupid as to end up in Miss Morrison's set in the first place .
There was no teaching of anything as far as I can see now.
OK, I'm rising up in defence of BJM!

Paralysed with fear? No teacher? No teaching of anything? BULLYING?

Believe me, having done time at Hertford and having worked in an almost entirely female-uniformed hierarchy, as well as having had several unbearable women bosses, I must have the most acute bully-dar of anyone I know! Miss Morrison a bully? Never, never, never!

It was bullying by senior girls once I was in a senior House, 6s, which led me to adopt the persona of overweight comedienne as a survival strategy. It was Miss Morrison who seemed to understand why I would behave in this way.

I have written before in great detail about the newly arrived Miss Morrison, who was our Form Mistress in L1Va - so I don't want to repeat myself. We were greatly in awe of her at first, then tuned into her wonderful dry wit, her immaculate organisational skills, her compassion, her ability to turn even a small query into the subject of interesting debate.

We used deliberately to lead her off-topic in English.

"Miss Morrison, for perfect pronunciation, should one pronounce the "h" in "white"?

"Can you tell from our accents where our homes are?"

"Miss Morrison, if you'd not been an English Mistress, what career would you have chosen?"

"Please, Miss Morrison, do you belong to a Union?"

I can see now the expression on her face as she considered her careful and interested response to every question. I was twelve at the time when I suppose BJM struck me as the first adult I'd met who delighted in reasoned debate. (I'd been brought up by Evangelical Christians :lol: )

I adored the importance she gave to grammar, spelling and punctuation. Even now, I think of her when I address an envelope with the flap on the right... If we spelled a word wrongly, we wrote it out three times at the bottom of the marked piece of work. ("Becomming" would have had this remedial treatment :wink:) Once, BJM came up with a list of words commonly misspelled which, she said, would always be useful to us. "Rhythm" and "ecstasy" were numbers one and two - so essential for our future correspondence -

On a Thursday afternoon, we had BJM English before the dreaded Needlework with a real bully, SWSNBN. Casually, Miss Morrison said that for this lesson we would read aloud our set book and if we had any adjustments to make to our needlework we could bring it out and sew as well. She'd realised the agitation and fear in the air! Fantastic.

A remarkable thing she did for me was casting me in a role for a Speech Day English Recitation. She had chosen a scene from GBS "Arms and the Man". Lesley Bonham was the Chocolate Soldier, I the romantic heroine. I was large, bouncy, "funny"; dedicated to disruptive behaviour. There were many slender pretty girls suitable for the part. Miss Morrison put me in a flowing negligeé thingy - it was as if she were showing me I had potential in other ways. I wasn't great in the role, but was amazed and encouraged that somebody saw something else to bring out in me.

In fact, she seemed to appreciate the individual foibles of us all.

Of all the staff - and I speak as one reduced to a nervous gibbering wreck in the presence of the corruscating genius of QMB, the bored glazed blue glance of Miss Taverner, the accurately aimed banderillas of scornful Miss Jukes, the blunt insensitive indifference of DR - it is dear Miss Morrison for whom I reserve love and respect.

Re: In Defence Of -

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 10:54 am
by Mid A 15
Angela Woodford wrote:
nastymum wrote:.Miss Morrison was no teacher though she my well have been witty.... we were either paralysed with fear at getting it wrong or underlined the entire book. There was no comment made by Miss Morrison or any questions asked by the pupils. She then set an essay title and our responses were subject to her dry wit. Or bullying, depending on your point of view.The pupis in the 'other set' scoffed and derided us for being so stupid as to end up in Miss Morrison's set in the first place .
There was no teaching of anything as far as I can see now.
OK, I'm rising up in defence of BJM!

Paralysed with fear? No teacher? No teaching of anything? BULLYING?

Believe me, having done time at Hertford and having worked in an almost entirely female-uniformed hierarchy, as well as having had several unbearable women bosses, I must have the most acute bully-dar of anyone I know! Miss Morrison a bully? Never, never, never!

It was bullying by senior girls once I was in a senior House, 6s, which led me to adopt the persona of overweight comedienne as a survival strategy. It was Miss Morrison who seemed to understand why I would behave in this way.

I have written before in great detail about the newly arrived Miss Morrison, who was our Form Mistress in L1Va - so I don't want to repeat myself. We were greatly in awe of her at first, then tuned into her wonderful dry wit, her immaculate organisational skills, her compassion, her ability to turn even a small query into the subject of interesting debate.

We used deliberately to lead her off-topic in English.

"Miss Morrison, for perfect pronunciation, should one pronounce the "h" in "white"?

"Can you tell from our accents where our homes are?"

"Miss Morrison, if you'd not been an English Mistress, what career would you have chosen?"

"Please, Miss Morrison, do you belong to a Union?"

I can see now the expression on her face as she considered her careful and interested response to every question. I was twelve at the time when I suppose BJM struck me as the first adult I'd met who delighted in reasoned debate. (I'd been brought up by Evangelical Christians :lol: )

I adored the importance she gave to grammar, spelling and punctuation. Even now, I think of her when I address an envelope with the flap on the right... If we spelled a word wrongly, we wrote it out three times at the bottom of the marked piece of work. ("Becomming" would have had this remedial treatment :wink:) Once, BJM came up with a list of words commonly misspelled which, she said, would always be useful to us. "Rhythm" and "ecstasy" were numbers one and two - so essential for our future correspondence -

On a Thursday afternoon, we had BJM English before the dreaded Needlework with a real bully, SWSNBN. Casually, Miss Morrison said that for this lesson we would read aloud our set book and if we had any adjustments to make to our needlework we could bring it out and sew as well. She'd realised the agitation and fear in the air! Fantastic.

A remarkable thing she did for me was casting me in a role for a Speech Day English Recitation. She had chosen a scene from GBS "Arms and the Man". Lesley Bonham was the Chocolate Soldier, I the romantic heroine. I was large, bouncy, "funny"; dedicated to disruptive behaviour. There were many slender pretty girls suitable for the part. Miss Morrison put me in a flowing negligeé thingy - it was as if she were showing me I had potential in other ways. I wasn't great in the role, but was amazed and encouraged that somebody saw something else to bring out in me.

In fact, she seemed to appreciate the individual foibles of us all.

Of all the staff - and I speak as one reduced to a nervous gibbering wreck in the presence of the corruscating genius of QMB, the bored glazed blue glance of Miss Taverner, the accurately aimed banderillas of scornful Miss Jukes, the blunt insensitive indifference of DR - it is dear Miss Morrison for whom I reserve love and respect.
I never knew her but that is a fine tribute.

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 12:58 pm
by Ajarn Philip
La Woodford does it again...

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 11:06 pm
by Jo
It is a fine tribute to Miss Morrison Munch, but what I think it shows is how each of us related in different ways to different staff. We seem to be pretty much in agreement about SWMNBN, but other than that different staff had something to offer almost everyone in some way. I didn't know Miss Taverner well but she always seemed ok to me, and I never had a problem with DR, although I have heard the same comments that you made from other people as well.

My personal favourites were the three history teachers: Miss Mercer, Miss Coles and Miss Marter (who became Mrs Roxburgh). Despite languages being my real forte, the language teachers weren't particularly memorable, at least not in an inspiring way, but those three ladies sparked a love of history and Miss Coles in particular was someone who enjoyed an intelligent debate.

It's nice to know that most teachers had the respect and admiration of at least some pupils. I doubt there were any that were liked and revered by absolutely everyone.

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Wed Jul 30, 2008 11:40 pm
by nastymum
Well , Jo is ever the voice of reason on many threads on this forum and can sense when it might be about to go pear shaped( and this not just because she as in 5's when I was there) but I believe that some of the older members of the forum don't quite understand how much teaching has moved on and improved. I see another Can of Worms opening but what the hell...

I still maintain that Miss M did not teach anything. She loved books and talking and directing but she never taught anything. She told us to do something and you had to guess how to do it and might get it right or wrong. She didn't teach you how to gut a text, use quotations,use discourse markers,link arguments, use an over -arching argument or any other skill that might be useful. To her it was simple-you could do it by divine right or not at all .

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Thu Jul 31, 2008 11:12 am
by Mid A 15
What is the role of a teacher and does that role differ in a boarding environment from a day environment?

In my view it's not all about transmitting academic information, there is an element of role model, mentor and pastoral carer too particularly in a boarding environment.

The teacher under discussion may have had real or perceived deficiencies in one area but it seems she made up for it in others.

Just my opinion from reading what's been written.

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Fri Aug 01, 2008 10:23 am
by Angela Woodford
[quote="nastymum") I believe that some of the older members of the forum don't quite understand how much teaching has moved on and improved. I see another Can of Worms opening but what the hell...[/quote]

Amazing co-incidence! Miss Morrison was thrilled when I asked her to judge the L1Va "Most Disgusting Way To Eat A Mars Bar" Competition (1965). She applied herself to the task with full gravitas and meticulous fairness, though I could see her vast bosom quivering with suppressed mirth. The competition was won by Frances Holmes - you can't imagine what she thought of doing with a Mars Bar! - and yes, worms did feature in her gruesome and horribly illustrated entry.

I'm not sure if nasty mum means

"I believe that some of the older members of the Forum don't quite understand how much teaching has moved on..."

Or else

"I believe that some of the older members of the Forum don't quite understand how much etc"

In either case this must mean me! Oh! Sad! Well, :oops: , I can only refer back to those dear ancient days when I wasn't taught text-gutting. I will attempt to take on board that teaching has really really changed... Poor old thing! :roll:

Maybe I'm just confused in my chronic state of senility.

However, thank you Andy, for putting into words that the affection I still hold for the memory of BJM is not reserved for her teaching alone. Viva Miss Morrison!

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Fri Aug 01, 2008 4:30 pm
by icomefromalanddownunder
I have no idea what text gutting is. Sadly, lovely Mrs Betterton can't have taught that either. Or maybe I wasn't paying attention.

But, you know what Munch? Inspite of, or because of, Miss Morrison's teaching, you string words together in a way that entertains and enlightens your readers. Please keep up the good work :D :D :D :D :D

A+ (for you and Miss Morrison).

xxxxxxx

Re: Favourite teacher

Posted: Fri Aug 08, 2008 9:49 pm
by Angela Woodford
Oh, oh oh!

I found that very kind post from Caroline rather later than when posted. How kind! :oops: That's my first ever A+!

However - "lovely Mrs Betterton"! She must have been the member of staff beloved by all. That formidable intellect, that was disguised in a sort of silvery delicacy! I remember the sheer pleasure of hearing her read to us from Chaucer in the original. Amazingly, the most frank, the most ribald phrases were unblushingly recited in a way that reflected the authentic voice of the poet.

How marvellous she was. A wonderful teacher who showed me how to appreciate many poems I still love to read.