Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Anything that doesn't fit anywhere else, but that's still CH related.

Moderator: Moderators

Post Reply
brian walling
2nd Former
Posts: 12
Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2004 9:32 pm
Real Name: Brian Walling
Location: Penang, Malaysia

Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by brian walling » Fri Sep 22, 2017 1:05 pm

What has happened to the various old "scholarships" that existed as means of entry to CH in my time (1950s)? Maybe somebody who visits this forum has an understanding of how these old arrangements have evolved.

I got to CH in 1953 at age 11 because I won one of the two places offered that year to the Borough of Ilford, Essex under what I understand was called the Country Parishes Scholarship scheme. I believe that there were a number of towns on the fringes of London that enjoyed this privilege -- providing parents of would-be pupils with an alternative to seeking out a willing Governor of CH to 'nominate' their child for a CH place. In Ilford the education authorities facilitated this scholarship arrangement by inviting local schools to submit candidates who then sat a competitive examination (set and adjudicated by CH itself) to determine the winners for that year. Did these scholarships simply disappear? If so, what happened to any endowments that might have been funding them?

Parents of children winning one of these places to CH were still subject to the usual means-testing and parental contributions. These scholarships in fact simply offered an additional way to get accepted at CH, so maybe they were not in fact really scholarships in the usual sense.

Any insights from anyone?

--------------------------------

I also have a similar question relating to life beyond CH: the open scholarships to Oxford and Cambridge that Grecians were expected to aim at. I remember in my year that the CH 'haul' of these was around 20. These were competitive Oxford/Cambridge college scholarships that, as well as the college/university entry that they bestowed, also provided considerable prestige to the winners and the school as well as various financial and fee-waiver benefits to the individual. What happened to these scholarships as an entry route to Oxford or Cambridge? I remember that a number of them were clearly labelled with name of a benefactor or an endowment. I don't see any reference to these scholarships' these days.

Again, any insights from anyone?
Ma A 53-60

Foureyes
Grecian
Posts: 642
Joined: Mon Dec 25, 2006 11:26 am
Real Name: David
Location: England

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by Foureyes » Thu Sep 28, 2017 11:53 am

Brian,
I was Lamb B 49-55, so we were contemporaries.
I am not totally sure of my facts on this, but my understanding was that the GLC, or whatever it was called in those days (but not the City) had scholarships for 100 places at C.H. Quite how they were administered I know not, as I went to the school under a different scheme. When Ken Livingstone became mayor and, ex officio, a governor, he quickly labelled C.H. as elitist and terminated all GLC involvement. I remember these events being discussed in terms of 'the end of civilisation as we know it' although the school obviously survived. It was, however, an outstanding and highly respected scheme and is still sadly missed.
David

John Saunders
LE (Little Erasmus)
Posts: 63
Joined: Tue Aug 30, 2005 10:51 am
Real Name: John Saunders
Location: Northumberland

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by John Saunders » Thu Sep 28, 2017 4:52 pm

I went to CH on a West Gifts Scholarship from Reading. The same year as Sinclair Wynshank. 1948. There was no charge to my parents. I understand that the West family were local Berkshire worthies who also endowed similar opportunities from Newbury. JHGS

Katharine
Button Grecian
Posts: 2933
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 10:44 pm
Real Name: Katharine Dobson
Location: Gwynedd

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by Katharine » Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:35 pm

As I understand it, it was the West Gift that kept the girls school open, as the will specified a number of girls to benefit as well as boys.

As to scholarships to Oxbridge, I know the one I had has changed a lot. It was an Abbott's Scholarship, then for the sons and daughters of the clergy of the Church of England, or the Church of Ireland, with a preference for those born in the West Riding of Yorkshire, who without this scholarship would not reap the full benefits of their time at the University. I knew nothing about the Scholarship, the College applied for one for me having already given me a place, so for me it wasn't an academic scholarship. I believe it was then restricted to the poorer colleges, presumably the ones without so many scholarships of their own. It was £50 a year, paid as £16/16/8 a term. On the strength of that I got a CH Exhibition which was a one off grant of £50 together with £25 on account for me at Blackwell's book shop.

I looked Abbott's Scholarship up, and currently they are not accepting any applications, which is sad.
Katharine Dobson (Hills) 6.14, 1959 - 1965
Don't worry about the world coming to an end today. It's already tomorrow in Australia!

User avatar
Mid A 15
Button Grecian
Posts: 2924
Joined: Thu May 19, 2005 1:38 pm
Real Name: Claude Rains
Location: The Patio Of England (Kent)

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by Mid A 15 » Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:52 pm

Katharine wrote:
Thu Sep 28, 2017 7:35 pm
As I understand it, it was the West Gift that kept the girls school open, as the will specified a number of girls to benefit as well as boys.

As to scholarships to Oxbridge, I know the one I had has changed a lot. It was an Abbott's Scholarship, then for the sons and daughters of the clergy of the Church of England, or the Church of Ireland, with a preference for those born in the West Riding of Yorkshire, who without this scholarship would not reap the full benefits of their time at the University. I knew nothing about the Scholarship, the College applied for one for me having already given me a place, so for me it wasn't an academic scholarship. I believe it was then restricted to the poorer colleges, presumably the ones without so many scholarships of their own. It was £50 a year, paid as £16/16/8 a term. On the strength of that I got a CH Exhibition which was a one off grant of £50 together with £25 on account for me at Blackwell's book shop.

I looked Abbott's Scholarship up, and currently they are not accepting any applications, which is sad.
Was Miss West the headmistress, as she would have been known during her time, related to the West Gift branch of the West family or is the name connection just a coincidence?
Ma A, Mid A 65 -72

Katharine
Button Grecian
Posts: 2933
Joined: Mon Dec 26, 2005 10:44 pm
Real Name: Katharine Dobson
Location: Gwynedd

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by Katharine » Thu Sep 28, 2017 8:57 pm

I think it is coincidence. She told us the history of the school every Founder's Day, and I'm sure she would have mentioned it had she been related!
Katharine Dobson (Hills) 6.14, 1959 - 1965
Don't worry about the world coming to an end today. It's already tomorrow in Australia!

alterblau
3rd Former
Posts: 44
Joined: Thu Sep 05, 2013 8:58 pm
Real Name: A Smith

Re: Scholarships to CH -- and beyond

Post by alterblau » Fri Sep 29, 2017 7:18 am

The West Gifts scholarships were for pupils from Reading, Newbury (about a dozen boys from each town) and a few from Twickenham. They were the bequest of John West and his wife Frances. Any of their relations who applied for West’s scholarships were given preference over other candidates. One such was Derek N. Humphreys. (Does anyone have any means of contacting him? If so please let me know?)

John West (1641-1723) apparently was not an OB, but died childless and a very wealthy man. He set up several charities (administered by CH). Apparently he made his money as a clothmaker, financier and scrivener (= notary) in London. Amongst his friends were Samuel Pepys and Sir John Moore (President of CH). West was also Pepys’s lawyer. All this and lots more is available on the internet. I’m pleased I looked him up (“John and Frances West”), for I recollect at school I was once told that West had made his money from growing sugar and slavery. Clearly that is totally wrong.

Someone (probably not West, though it may have been) left some property in Reading to CH. For one such fine house (in Redlands Road, Reading) some strange legal reason requires that although the house is ‘owned’ by its occupier, a ‘ground rent’ of some paltry sum must be paid each year to CH. Some years ago the owner offered several times to pay a lump sum to CH to rid himself of the trouble of making the yearly payments. The offer was always declined.

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests