History of the Band

Anything that doesn't fit anywhere else, but that's still CH related.

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John Saunders
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History of the Band

Post by John Saunders »

I have today received my copy of the band history. What a splendid piece of work.Congratulations to Clifford Jones. Buy now before stocks run out. John Saunders retired first trumpet.

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Re: History of the Band

Post by rockfreak »

Looking at some Beating the Retreat footage on You Tube I noted the band playing the march that was the Monty Python theme tune. Did this ever get played at lunchtime and if so how many people got punished for going into a John Cleese silly walk?

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Re: History of the Band

Post by J.R. »

rockfreak wrote:
Wed Oct 18, 2017 8:33 pm
Looking at some Beating the Retreat footage on You Tube I noted the band playing the march that was the Monty Python theme tune. Did this ever get played at lunchtime and if so how many people got punished for going into a John Cleese silly walk?
"The Liberty Bell" which was written by John Philip Sousa.

Yes - It was played and marched too during my time at CH, which was pre Monty Python, hence no silly walks/marches.

The playing of Glen Millers version of St Louis Blues March was frowned upon though by band master Mr Bailey.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by jhopgood »

J.R. wrote:
Thu Oct 19, 2017 2:36 pm

"The Liberty Bell" which was written by John Philip Sousa.

Yes - It was played and marched too during my time at CH, which was pre Monty Python, hence no silly walks/marches.

The playing of Glen Millers version of St Louis Blues March was frowned upon though by band master Mr Bailey.
Not sure whose version it was but we certainly played it in concert but not on parade.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by davidtaplin »

Being a member of the Band 1951-1957 was for me an excellent aspect of life at Housey with tours around the Sussex Fairs and a great camaraderie. The Drum Major of my time became a four-star General and the Band Captain a double Oxford Blue.

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Re: History of the Band

Post by Chrissie Boy »

A few days ago I was watching a YouTube video of the band taking part in 2018's Lord Mayor's Show and was staggered to see a row of bassoon players towards the rear of the squad. I was staggered not because I'm an ignoramus who doesn't know that bassoons are allowable in military bands, but because I have no recollection whatever of there having been bassoons in the band in my own day (1970s). Clarinets and piccolos, certainly, but bassoons? I barely even recall bassoons in the school orchestra, let alone the band.

Has dense pampas grass grown all over my brain? Or am I justified in having no memory at all of bassoons in the band in my day, because there weren't any? If so, when were they brought in and whose idea was it? And are there fifes in the band now as well? And natural trumpets?

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Re: History of the Band

Post by J.R. »

Pretty sure there weren't any in my day in the band.
JH probably has a better memory than me.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by Otter »

There was bassoons in the Band in the mid-90s when I was there.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by sejintenej »

Chrissie Boy wrote:
Wed Jun 26, 2019 10:32 am
I was staggered not because I'm an ignoramus who doesn't know that bassoons are allowable in military bands, but because I have no recollection whatever of there having been bassoons in the band in my own day (1970s). Clarinets and piccolos, certainly, but bassoons? I barely even recall bassoons in the school orchestra, let alone the band.
ARE there ANY rules as to what instruments can be used in military bands? As for CH surely it was a question of what competent musicians, instruments ands music scores were available?
I listen to a lot of international Military Tattoos and they seem to get anything which makes a sound! (Currently listening to Arrival in the Netherlands written by half of Abba.)

Edit; just watched 50+ UK regiments and units at Wembley - and they even had kettle drums (but no horses)
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Re: History of the Band

Post by jhopgood »

J.R. wrote:
Wed Jun 26, 2019 1:02 pm
Pretty sure there weren't any in my day in the band.
JH probably has a better memory than me.
At least two bassoons. Geoff Stearns played one.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by MrEd »

There were bassoons in the band in my time, late 70s to mid-80s. I played the clarinet (badly) for a while, not making past a brief stint in the Second Band. The bassoon was certainly a feature of the Band, albeit exotic. The starter instrument was the clarinet or oboe in woodwind, and you could progress to saxophone or bassoon respectively with talent, as flautists could go on to the piccolo.

I now enjoy playing the viola.
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Re: History of the Band

Post by ASR »

I was in the band until 1973 - it was the era of the first flush of Monty Python on TV – and eagerly watched by all on the rationed, dodgy PeA black and white telly.

How funny we thought it was when we regularly played the Liberty Bell march - the Python theme tune - as the school marched into lunch.

Silly walks? Did you see the marching?

And yes there were bassoons in the band at that time . . . but no saxophones yet, think that came a year or so after I left.

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Re: History of the Band

Post by Chrissie Boy »

MrEd wrote:
Thu Jun 27, 2019 7:38 pm
I now enjoy playing the viola.
Do your neighbours and your family-members enjoy your playing the viola?

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Re: History of the Band

Post by MrEd »

Do your neighbours and your family-members enjoy your playing the viola?
On the basis that it is mellow, well, compared to its screechy, showy little sister, they almost do. :D

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Re: History of the Band

Post by J.R. »

MrEd wrote:
Wed Jul 10, 2019 6:58 pm
Do your neighbours and your family-members enjoy your playing the viola?
On the basis that it is mellow, well, compared to its screechy, showy little sister, they almost do. :D
At the risk of being targeted yet again for being fatuous...

OOH, MATRON !!!
John Rutley. Prep B & Coleridge B. 1958-1963.

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