Teaching staff

Anything that doesn't fit anywhere else, but that's still CH related.

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ZeroDeConduite
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Re: Teaching staff

Post by ZeroDeConduite » Tue Nov 06, 2018 10:37 am

I was shown round the Cambridge Mathematical Lab in the holidays during my LE year, about 1955, where EDSAC was installed in about three rooms. A relation was one of the professors who supervised its use, all punched tape and mystery. And air-conditioning ;-).
I stayed a few days with my relation, and evening 'entertainment' was proof reading the galley proofs of the latest edition of Cambridge Mathematical Tables, which meant checking every single calculation in the book with a Brunsviga desktop calculator - he had three calculators and I was set to work on one, alongside his son, who was about the same age as me...
It was about 30 years later that I next encountered a computer, and from that time they have been a daily work/play necessity - though I don't get on with these newfangled smart phones haha because I need my three monitors and multiple opened windows :D
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Re: Teaching staff

Post by michael scuffil » Tue Nov 06, 2018 1:58 pm

Only one of my contemporaries at CH, or at least of those that I knew well, made a career in computing. He was an English Grecian, and read English at Oxford.

As for Joe Lyons mentioned above: When I first arrived in Cambridge, it was a Sunday afternoon, I wandered around the town and happened to see the Joe Lyons teashop, which I went into and had a cup of tea. It was an island of familiarity in an otherwise alien world*. I think it was the only time I went into the Cambridge Lyons.

*I suppose that's the appeal of McDonalds and Starbucks nowadays.
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Re: Teaching staff

Post by michael scuffil » Tue Nov 06, 2018 2:04 pm

I don't get on with these newfangled smart phones

I've never seen the point of them. They're no use as computers, and not particularly good as phones (dumbphones are better). Their main use is for taking snapshots and the instantaneous transmission of pictures. My wife inherited one from our granddaughter. I told her she'd hardly use it, and it's true.
Th.B. 27 1955-63

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Re: Teaching staff

Post by J.R. » Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:14 pm

How time rushes past.

Dippy nib pens and messy ink-wells in my day. Biros etc forbidden. Calculators were still far away on the horizon, though I doubt CMES would have ever allowed them if they had suddenly appeared off the horizon.
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William
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Re: Teaching staff

Post by William » Wed Nov 07, 2018 7:44 am

Katharine wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 9:19 am
I did Maths A level in the mid 60s, (for obvious reasons can't say I was a Maths Grecian!) and there was never any mention of computing as a career. I don't think it was seen as 'real' mathematics. It was seen as a tool, just as log tables were. All praise to Mr Bullard for taking you. Leo is well known in computing history.

Alas for Katherine and others, that they had no Mr JE Bullard at Hertford. He did more than organise that Grecians' visit to London, with Mr DCF Chaundy in the party. (He taught physics [also ballroom and Morris dancing!] and had electronics as a hobby.) I clearly remember a talk JEB gave in 1955 to the school Science Society entitled, "Fast Electronic Digital Computers." There was an account of this talk published in the CH NHS and Science Magazine. The most memorable part of the talk comprised words such as, "During your lifetime your lives are going to be changed by these machines, in ways that you cannot imagine."
Last edited by William on Wed Nov 07, 2018 11:47 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Teaching staff

Post by sejintenej » Wed Nov 07, 2018 10:08 am

J.R. wrote:
Tue Nov 06, 2018 5:14 pm
How time rushes past.

Dippy nib pens and messy ink-wells in my day. Biros etc forbidden. Calculators were still far away on the horizon, though I doubt CMES would have ever allowed them if they had suddenly appeared off the horizon.
In my professional exams one long paper involved a large number of foreign exchange calculations including up to about 7 places of decimals and we were not allowed to use any type of calculators. Back to long division and multiplication - an absolute ****** of an exam.
"The best way to think outside the box is to not know where the box is"
The"world's best guitar player", Amin Toufani talking about Lygometry

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