Milk

Share your memories and stories from your days at school, and find out the truth behind the rumours....Remember the teachers and pupils, tell us who you remember and why...

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sejintenej
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Re: Milk

Post by sejintenej » Thu Jan 30, 2020 3:27 pm

brian walling wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 7:54 am
, ..............because it was said to be good for us and the growth of our bodies (calcium, good for bones etc). .............., I'm inclined to accept that the little bit of brainwashing about "good for you" was probably justified and did me some good.
Interesting that I am hearing the same thing even now, However my wife has a stomach complaint for which they recommend to avoid all dairy products and a pack of other things.
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Re: Milk

Post by LongGone » Thu Jan 30, 2020 9:32 pm

sejintenej wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 3:27 pm
brian walling wrote:
Thu Jan 30, 2020 7:54 am
, ..............because it was said to be good for us and the growth of our bodies (calcium, good for bones etc). .............., I'm inclined to accept that the little bit of brainwashing about "good for you" was probably justified and did me some good.
Interesting that I am hearing the same thing even now, However my wife has a stomach complaint for which they recommend to avoid all dairy products and a pack of other things.
The fact that some people are lactose intolerant doesn’t change the fact that, for the vast majority, including dairy products as part of your diet is a good thing.
If a stone falls on an egg: alas for the egg
If an egg falls on a stone: alas for the egg

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Re: Milk

Post by Pe.A » Fri Jan 31, 2020 8:07 am

Otter wrote:
Tue Jan 28, 2020 2:03 pm
Thought I would add some levity while discussing the incredibly important issue of milk in boarding houses.

I remember in the mid 90s we got biblical quantities of milk delivered every weekday to every boarding house. A massive crate of 15 or 20 bottles of 2 pints each.

A lot of it went unused. Those who felt like it, were free to take vast quantities, a bottle or more each.

I occasionally took an entire bottle and drank it out of my large plastic measuring jug that I used for cup-a-soups. When I got to my seniors and meal attendance monitoring became lax, 2 pints of milk served as an entire meal if it was lousy weather and I didn't want to walk to dining hall.

I was recently reminded of this time in my life as my toddler son now takes that very measuring jug and loves vocalising into it to make funny noises, or just carrying it around the house proudly.

:drinkers:
People used to mostly drink it from the bottle...

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Re: Milk

Post by J.R. » Fri Jan 31, 2020 2:50 pm

Jack Hards !!
That name brings back memories.
John Rutley. Prep B & Coleridge B. 1958-1963.

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Re: Milk

Post by Mid A 15 » Fri Jan 31, 2020 4:15 pm

J.R. wrote:
Fri Jan 31, 2020 2:50 pm
Jack Hards !!
That name brings back memories.
Little bald headed bloke wearing a brown coat in the wardrobe is how I remember him.

On the actual topic of Milk, 'loringa' has described some elements that I recall it from my time. 'Nice' biscuits were particularly coveted.
Ma A, Mid A 65 -72

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Re: Milk

Post by jhopgood » Fri Jan 31, 2020 5:57 pm

eucsgmrc wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 1:01 pm
brian walling wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 11:38 am
... to clean up afterwards. They disposed of the unused milk, after setting aside enough for the monitors' late night coffee and cocoa drinking, then placed the crates and empty bottles outside the back of the house for pick-up.
"Setting aside": we couldn't keep the bottles back, so, in Col A, the reserved milk was poured into a large black enamelled saucepan and simply left in a relatively safe place in the dayroom. Woe betide anybody who tipped it over or dropped anything in it. On hot summer days it might go off a bit before the evening. That was accepted as normal - after all, fridges were not part of most people's daily lives. It was an era when even the fanciest households were used to relying on pantry, larder and meat safe to keep food, and daily shopping to have fresh food. Many of our families were buying their first ever fridges in that decade.
Same in Barnes B, where as a swab, I had to take said saucepan up to Matron's and boil the milk, a difficult job as it was nearly always filled to the brim, and then take it down to the dayroom, before going back upstairs to get washed and ready for Matron's inspection. I was also charged with smuggling flab out of the Dining Hall for the monitor's toast. Someone else got the bread for the toast.
Barnes B 25 (59 - 66)

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Re: Milk

Post by scrub » Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:05 pm

loringa wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 8:39 am
I seem to remember nobody ever used a knife but just wiped the bread on the still-wrapped butter.
:lol: knives were hard to come by, but I remember doing this too. Peeling the top of the butter pack, then rubbing it on the toast until the coverage was acceptable. I did this in the first share house I lived in (I was very drunk) and still remember the look of disgust on a housemate's face when they saw me doing it. It wasn't as common a practice as my time at CH had led me to believe :lol:
ThB 89-91, PeA 93-96

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Re: Milk

Post by Great Plum » Sat Feb 01, 2020 10:20 pm

scrub wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:05 pm
loringa wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 8:39 am
I seem to remember nobody ever used a knife but just wiped the bread on the still-wrapped butter.
:lol: knives were hard to come by, but I remember doing this too. Peeling the top of the butter pack, then rubbing it on the toast until the coverage was acceptable. I did this in the first share house I lived in (I was very drunk) and still remember the look of disgust on a housemate's face when they saw me doing it. It wasn't as common a practice as my time at CH had led me to believe :lol:
This was very common in Maine a in the late 90s
Maine B - 1992-95 Maine A 1995-99

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Re: Milk

Post by Pe.A » Tue Feb 04, 2020 2:09 pm

scrub wrote:
Sat Feb 01, 2020 9:05 pm
loringa wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 8:39 am
I seem to remember nobody ever used a knife but just wiped the bread on the still-wrapped butter.
:lol: knives were hard to come by, but I remember doing this too. Peeling the top of the butter pack, then rubbing it on the toast until the coverage was acceptable. I did this in the first share house I lived in (I was very drunk) and still remember the look of disgust on a housemate's face when they saw me doing it. It wasn't as common a practice as my time at CH had led me to believe :lol:
Thing is, it worked so well in getting the toast buttered...
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Re: Milk

Post by ColA25 » Tue Feb 04, 2020 5:21 pm

loringa wrote:
Wed Jan 29, 2020 8:39 am
If I recall correctly, during the 70s it was delivered in milk churns daily to the boarding houses from the home farm dairy.
Yes, I think you remember correctly. Sometimes the milk was distinctly off even by breakfast time, though the staff (Mrs Keeley I think) tried to persuade us that it was just "creamy" - but no amount of Nesquik would make it drinkable.
Phil Naylor
BaB17 / ColA25
1971-77

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